german-cars-after-1945:

Mercedes NAFA Concept Car - 1982
german-cars-after-1945:

Mercedes NAFA Concept Car - 1982
german-cars-after-1945:

Mercedes NAFA Concept Car - 1982
german-cars-after-1945:

Mercedes NAFA Concept Car - 1982
kateoplis:

“A 180-degree turn from Mr. Anderson’s relentless oil odyssey…“Inherent Vice” is his most comedic and anarchic film since “Boogie Nights.” It’s a stoner detective film so overstuffed with visual gags and gimmicks that the filmmaker said he was inspired by slapstick spoofs like “Top Secret!” and “Airplane!””
“Like the novel, the film is set in 1970 in the fictional Gordita Beach, Calif., among paranoid burnouts, white-supremacist bikers, black-power ex-cons, and hippies turned toothless heroin addicts. The “gum-sandal” detective Doc Sportello (a mutton-chopped, mumbly Mr. Phoenix) begins investigating a mystery at the behest of his free-spirited ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) and to the consternation of the corrupt cop Bigfoot Bjornsen, played by Mr. [Josh] Brolin with a “flattop of Flintstone proportions,” as a character says in the film, and a malicious “twinkle in his eye that says ‘civil rights violations.’ ”
Along the way, Doc uncovers a conspiracy that touches the shady land developer Mickey Wolfmann (Eric Roberts) and a surf-rock saxophonist named Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson), both of whom may either be dead or alive. Looming over them all is the specter of the Golden Fang, which may be a boat, an Indochinese heroin cartel, a rehab center, a syndicate of dentists — or something even more vast.”
Inherent Vice will have its premiere as the centerpiece of the New York Film Festival next Saturday, and open in theaters Dec. 12. 


Sounds like a laugh-riot. kateoplis:

“A 180-degree turn from Mr. Anderson’s relentless oil odyssey…“Inherent Vice” is his most comedic and anarchic film since “Boogie Nights.” It’s a stoner detective film so overstuffed with visual gags and gimmicks that the filmmaker said he was inspired by slapstick spoofs like “Top Secret!” and “Airplane!””
“Like the novel, the film is set in 1970 in the fictional Gordita Beach, Calif., among paranoid burnouts, white-supremacist bikers, black-power ex-cons, and hippies turned toothless heroin addicts. The “gum-sandal” detective Doc Sportello (a mutton-chopped, mumbly Mr. Phoenix) begins investigating a mystery at the behest of his free-spirited ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) and to the consternation of the corrupt cop Bigfoot Bjornsen, played by Mr. [Josh] Brolin with a “flattop of Flintstone proportions,” as a character says in the film, and a malicious “twinkle in his eye that says ‘civil rights violations.’ ”
Along the way, Doc uncovers a conspiracy that touches the shady land developer Mickey Wolfmann (Eric Roberts) and a surf-rock saxophonist named Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson), both of whom may either be dead or alive. Looming over them all is the specter of the Golden Fang, which may be a boat, an Indochinese heroin cartel, a rehab center, a syndicate of dentists — or something even more vast.”
Inherent Vice will have its premiere as the centerpiece of the New York Film Festival next Saturday, and open in theaters Dec. 12. 


Sounds like a laugh-riot. kateoplis:

“A 180-degree turn from Mr. Anderson’s relentless oil odyssey…“Inherent Vice” is his most comedic and anarchic film since “Boogie Nights.” It’s a stoner detective film so overstuffed with visual gags and gimmicks that the filmmaker said he was inspired by slapstick spoofs like “Top Secret!” and “Airplane!””
“Like the novel, the film is set in 1970 in the fictional Gordita Beach, Calif., among paranoid burnouts, white-supremacist bikers, black-power ex-cons, and hippies turned toothless heroin addicts. The “gum-sandal” detective Doc Sportello (a mutton-chopped, mumbly Mr. Phoenix) begins investigating a mystery at the behest of his free-spirited ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) and to the consternation of the corrupt cop Bigfoot Bjornsen, played by Mr. [Josh] Brolin with a “flattop of Flintstone proportions,” as a character says in the film, and a malicious “twinkle in his eye that says ‘civil rights violations.’ ”
Along the way, Doc uncovers a conspiracy that touches the shady land developer Mickey Wolfmann (Eric Roberts) and a surf-rock saxophonist named Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson), both of whom may either be dead or alive. Looming over them all is the specter of the Golden Fang, which may be a boat, an Indochinese heroin cartel, a rehab center, a syndicate of dentists — or something even more vast.”
Inherent Vice will have its premiere as the centerpiece of the New York Film Festival next Saturday, and open in theaters Dec. 12. 


Sounds like a laugh-riot. kateoplis:

“A 180-degree turn from Mr. Anderson’s relentless oil odyssey…“Inherent Vice” is his most comedic and anarchic film since “Boogie Nights.” It’s a stoner detective film so overstuffed with visual gags and gimmicks that the filmmaker said he was inspired by slapstick spoofs like “Top Secret!” and “Airplane!””
“Like the novel, the film is set in 1970 in the fictional Gordita Beach, Calif., among paranoid burnouts, white-supremacist bikers, black-power ex-cons, and hippies turned toothless heroin addicts. The “gum-sandal” detective Doc Sportello (a mutton-chopped, mumbly Mr. Phoenix) begins investigating a mystery at the behest of his free-spirited ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) and to the consternation of the corrupt cop Bigfoot Bjornsen, played by Mr. [Josh] Brolin with a “flattop of Flintstone proportions,” as a character says in the film, and a malicious “twinkle in his eye that says ‘civil rights violations.’ ”
Along the way, Doc uncovers a conspiracy that touches the shady land developer Mickey Wolfmann (Eric Roberts) and a surf-rock saxophonist named Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson), both of whom may either be dead or alive. Looming over them all is the specter of the Golden Fang, which may be a boat, an Indochinese heroin cartel, a rehab center, a syndicate of dentists — or something even more vast.”
Inherent Vice will have its premiere as the centerpiece of the New York Film Festival next Saturday, and open in theaters Dec. 12. 


Sounds like a laugh-riot.

kateoplis:

A 180-degree turn from Mr. Anderson’s relentless oil odyssey…“Inherent Vice” is his most comedic and anarchic film since “Boogie Nights.” It’s a stoner detective film so overstuffed with visual gags and gimmicks that the filmmaker said he was inspired by slapstick spoofs like “Top Secret!” and “Airplane!”

Like the novel, the film is set in 1970 in the fictional Gordita Beach, Calif., among paranoid burnouts, white-supremacist bikers, black-power ex-cons, and hippies turned toothless heroin addicts. The “gum-sandal” detective Doc Sportello (a mutton-chopped, mumbly Mr. Phoenix) begins investigating a mystery at the behest of his free-spirited ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth (Katherine Waterston) and to the consternation of the corrupt cop Bigfoot Bjornsen, played by Mr. [Josh] Brolin with a “flattop of Flintstone proportions,” as a character says in the film, and a malicious “twinkle in his eye that says ‘civil rights violations.’ ”

Along the way, Doc uncovers a conspiracy that touches the shady land developer Mickey Wolfmann (Eric Roberts) and a surf-rock saxophonist named Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson), both of whom may either be dead or alive. Looming over them all is the specter of the Golden Fang, which may be a boat, an Indochinese heroin cartel, a rehab center, a syndicate of dentists — or something even more vast.”

Inherent Vice will have its premiere as the centerpiece of the New York Film Festival next Saturday, and open in theaters Dec. 12. 

Sounds like a laugh-riot.

(via ratsoff)

80slove:

1980’s Bang & Olufsen phones
80slove:

1980’s Bang & Olufsen phones
80slove:

1980’s Bang & Olufsen phones
80slove:

1980’s Bang & Olufsen phones

80slove:

1980’s Bang & Olufsen phones

(via ratsoff)

carguy911:

clubmulholland:

Johan van der Gugten Porsche 911. Liking that decklid grille treatment a lot…

Looks perfect !

(via airows)

Tell them I’m fucking coming.

(via ratsoff)

The White Knight.

(via dethjunkie)

zgmfd:

Public Image Ltd poster for Album (1986)

cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.
In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles 
Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”
“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”
“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”
“What?”
“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”
Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:
“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”
“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.
In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles 
Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”
“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”
“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”
“What?”
“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”
Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:
“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”
“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.

In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles

Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”

“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”

“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”

“What?”

“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”

Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:

“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”

“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

thecomicsvault:

"Jack is dead. Call me…JOKER!"

BATMAN: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION (1989)
Art by Jerry Ordway (pencils/inks) & Steve Oliff (colors)
Words by Dennis O’Neil 

Jacker.

(via retazosdered)

Clarky Cat.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf

Paris Rooftops

Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust

nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust

escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light

escapekit:

Reflection Field

American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light