cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.
In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles 
Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”
“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”
“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”
“What?”
“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”
Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:
“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”
“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.
In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles 
Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”
“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”
“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”
“What?”
“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”
Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:
“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”
“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Orson Welles meets Jack Nicholson, circa 1976, courtesy of Will McCrabb.

In 1971, director Henry Jaglom was in hot pursuit of the legendary Orson Welles. Jaglom desperately wanted Welles to star in his feature debut, A Safe Place, opposite Jack Nicholson, and flew to the Plaza Hotel in New York to make his pitch. Welles agreed — the prospect of getting to wear a magician’s cape was the selling point — and a most unexpected friendship blossomed. —My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles

Peter Biskind records the exchange in his introduction to My Lunches with Orson. Welles came to Jaglom during a break:

“You’re the arrogant kid who pushed me into this. How’s your arrogance doing?”

“Not very well. The crew hates me. They’re totally negative. Everything I tell them to shoot, they say, ‘It won’t cut,’ or ‘it’s not in the script.’ I have to fight to get every single shot. I’m exhausted.”

“Oh my God, I should have prepared you. Tell ‘em it’s a dream sequence.”

“What?”

“Just do as I tell you. Trust me. You trusted me enough to hire me. Do it.”

Jaglom took Welles’ advice and got results. He went back to Welles:

“What the fuck is this? Everything I want to do, I say, ‘Dream sequence,’ and they’re pussycats.”

“You have to understand, these are people who work hard for a living. They have tough lives. Structured lives. They work all day, then they have dinner, put their kids to bed, go to sleep, and get back to the set at five o’clock the next morning. Everything else in life except for dreams has rules.” —Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles, On Screen: A Safe Place and Someone to Love

Here’s a rarity: A Safe Place outtakes with Orson Welles; never-before-seen footage of Henry Jaglom’s feature debut featuring Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles and Jack Nicholson.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

thecomicsvault:

"Jack is dead. Call me…JOKER!"

BATMAN: THE OFFICIAL COMIC ADAPTATION (1989)
Art by Jerry Ordway (pencils/inks) & Steve Oliff (colors)
Words by Dennis O’Neil 

Jacker.

(via retazosdered)

Clarky Cat.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf
Paris Rooftops
Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Michael Wolf

Paris Rooftops

Being born in Munich, growing up in Canada and the United States and now living in Hong Kong, German photographer Michael Wolf is fascinated by his surroundings and contemporary life in big cities. After capturing the architectural density of his adoptive hometown and claustrophobic images of public transport passengers, Wolf now offers a different view on Paris. His series „paris roof tops“ avoids all the clichés connected to the „city of lights“ and instead features geometric patterns and muted colours in the distinctive looks of the French capital’s buildings.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Robert Longo
Charcoal on paper
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust
nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust

nevver:

Darkness of the edge of town, Patrick Joust

escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light
escapekit:

Reflection Field
American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light

escapekit:

Reflection Field

American artist Phillip K Smith III (Previously) for this year’s Coachella festival, created an installation of shiny cuboids that by day provided a series of mirrors, but by night were transformed into neon towers of light

no23:

Alien, 1979.

fiore-rosso:

Steven Holl Architects
Sliced Porosity Block
Chengdu, China

asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.


asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker
David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.
via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.
There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.

asylum-art:

Spectacular Self-portrait by  David Whittaker

David Whittaker was born in Cornwall in 1964. and is currently based in Newquay. He is self-taught, has exhibited widely and won the first prize at The National Open Art Competition in 2011.

via Millennium. He is self taught. Most of his works are based around the loose form of the human head and it’s metaphysical core. Ambiguous non specific portraits, walking a high wire perfectly balanced between states of calm and conflict, confidence and nervousness, hopes and fears, conscious and subconscious, male and female. They are innately, universally human.

There is a suggestion of the powerful and inescapable link between Whittaker and his art  that both live through each other and that the paintings unmask and reveal a true identity. This identity is ambiguous, internal and ephemeral, our own warren to explore, but where some the tunnels remain blocked consciously or unconsciously. Through art these tunnels can be accessed.

spacewatching:

Polish space stamps showing different launched vehicles and their orbits from the 1960’s. Excellent typography, line work and color.

spacewatching:

Polish space stamps showing different launched vehicles and their orbits from the 1960’s. Excellent typography, line work and color.

intheshadowplay:

Michael Heizer, Dissipate No. 8 of Nine Nevada Depressions, 1968.

archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”
archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak
"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”

archatlas:

Drive-In Prints Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak

"The Drive-in Prints by artist Pete Ware aka 17h and Oak pays homage to the movies by combining iconic characters and famous quotes in the form of typography art. Each print is developed from scratch and utilises their silhouette and key features to bring you a unique perspective of your favourite films.”

architags:

Haskell House. Jorge Hrdina Architects. Australia. photos (c) Jorge Hrdina Architects
architags:

Haskell House. Jorge Hrdina Architects. Australia. photos (c) Jorge Hrdina Architects
architags:

Haskell House. Jorge Hrdina Architects. Australia. photos (c) Jorge Hrdina Architects
architags:

Haskell House. Jorge Hrdina Architects. Australia. photos (c) Jorge Hrdina Architects

architags:

Haskell House. Jorge Hrdina Architects. Australia. photos (c) Jorge Hrdina Architects